Laundry Room and Root Cellar

Lest you think that the Basement of Doom wasn't actually that full of doom, today we're taking a sneak peek into the laundry room and root cellar. They come complete with bizarre electrical cords, bare lightbulbs, unfinished floors, holes in the walls leading who-knows-where, and a century of accumulated grime.

Awesome, right?

To properly orient yourself, imagine that you've taken a couple of steps into the room (from the main part of the basement) and then turned to your left. We'll be moving counter-clockwise around the room.

Ready? Grab your blankie for comfort and let's go.

At some point, I'd love to upgrade the washer and dryer to larger capacity models -- right now I'm doing 8-10 loads of laundry a week, which equals too much time in this pit of despair. There are nice storage shelves to the right, though, so at least I have a place to put folded laundry before it gets hauled upstairs.

At some point, I'd love to upgrade the washer and dryer to larger capacity models -- right now I'm doing 8-10 loads of laundry a week, which equals too much time in this pit of despair. There are nice storage shelves to the right, though, so at least I have a place to put folded laundry before it gets hauled upstairs.

Bwa-ha-ha, behold the boiler! What you see before you is a high-efficiency boiler, which heats the water/steam that runs through the radiators on the first and second floors of the manor. Bill put up those brick pavers in front of the boiler to prevent any kittens from investigating and inadvertently being fried when the boiler kicks on. (If you look at the wall just behind the top left of the boiler, you can see the hole in the wall where the servants used to shovel coal into the old boiler system. So glad we don't have to deal with that!)

Bwa-ha-ha, behold the boiler! What you see before you is a high-efficiency boiler, which heats the water/steam that runs through the radiators on the first and second floors of the manor. Bill put up those brick pavers in front of the boiler to prevent any kittens from investigating and inadvertently being fried when the boiler kicks on. (If you look at the wall just behind the top left of the boiler, you can see the hole in the wall where the servants used to shovel coal into the old boiler system. So glad we don't have to deal with that!)

To the left of the boiler is a table (handy for piling laundry!) and our double hot water heaters. These babies are on their last legs and will need to be replaced ASAP. We're thinking about installing a tankless hot water heater, but haven't done the necessary homework to figure out the details.

To the left of the boiler is a table (handy for piling laundry!) and our double hot water heaters. These babies are on their last legs and will need to be replaced ASAP. We're thinking about installing a tankless hot water heater, but haven't done the necessary homework to figure out the details.

Continuing our journey, the next stop is the workbench. I'm currently using it for (you guessed it!) piling up laundry, but eventually Bill may use it for some of his tinkering.

Continuing our journey, the next stop is the workbench. I'm currently using it for (you guessed it!) piling up laundry, but eventually Bill may use it for some of his tinkering.

We've now come full circle, with the door to the main part of the basement showing at the far left side of the photo above. You can also see that Bill has installed a storage rack that now groans under the collective weight of our camping stuff. (The last time we went camping? Four years ago. But I digress.) And see the door kind of hidden on the right? That goes to the root cellar. Let's take a closer look, shall we?

We've now come full circle, with the door to the main part of the basement showing at the far left side of the photo above. You can also see that Bill has installed a storage rack that now groans under the collective weight of our camping stuff. (The last time we went camping? Four years ago. But I digress.) And see the door kind of hidden on the right? That goes to the root cellar. Let's take a closer look, shall we?

Standing in the doorway to the root cellar, this is what you see. A ridiculous number of electrical panels and another dryer. Does it work? I have no idea -- I haven't tried using it yet.

Standing in the doorway to the root cellar, this is what you see. A ridiculous number of electrical panels and another dryer. Does it work? I have no idea -- I haven't tried using it yet.

Looking to the right, you'll see our holiday decorations. We may eventually get more formal storage shelves to keep everything off the floor, but for now it works.

Looking to the right, you'll see our holiday decorations. We may eventually get more formal storage shelves to keep everything off the floor, but for now it works.

On the other side of the cellar are wooden shelves that hold more holiday stuff and our empty canning jars. Doesn't the brick wall look like something you might execute someone against? I can definitely see a firing squad in here -- although the sound of rifles firing in this enclosed space (not to mention the ricochet) might be a deterrent.

On the other side of the cellar are wooden shelves that hold more holiday stuff and our empty canning jars. Doesn't the brick wall look like something you might execute someone against? I can definitely see a firing squad in here -- although the sound of rifles firing in this enclosed space (not to mention the ricochet) might be a deterrent.

Quick -- the door! Escape while there's still time and let's try to forget that we were ever down here. 

Quick -- the door! Escape while there's still time and let's try to forget that we were ever down here. 

As much as this section of the house gives me the willies, I'm not sure whether it will ever be "worth it" to refinish this part of the house. Maybe every old house needs a creepy cellar to keep it authentic. What do you think, dear readers?